Transmission Removal on DE38 Engines and Such Forums

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Transmission Removal on DE38
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Patrick Twohig
San Diego, CA
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May 12, 2014 - 12:35 am
Member Since: March 13, 2014
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I spent this weekend pulling out the old Hurth 10-2R transmission that was in my DE38.  It was quite a process, but I took pictures every step of the way.

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Scott Carle
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May 12, 2014 - 9:58 pm
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looks like fun.. lol NOT!!!!!

I know in a few years I will have the engine project and am not looking forward to it.

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Scott Carle DE38 Cutter s/v Valkyr
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Patrick Twohig
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May 13, 2014 - 12:57 am
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Yeah, if I were to do it again, I'd not recommend my jerry rigged solution of using ratchet straps, though it was surprisingly effective.  It was nice that I didn't have to block the entrance to the engine room so I could still sit back in there.  However, getting it back down was not so fun, basically had to undo them one at a time so it didn't drop the engine back on the mounts.  The mounts are probably worn out and I could stand to replace them, but I don't see how I can get to the backing plate on the aft mounts without pulling the whole engine out of there.  I'm afraid that if I undo the bolts on the aft mounts you'd just hear a nut fall into the bilge followed by the sound of me softly weeping.

 

After I got in there it wasn't so intimidating, I haven't gotten a call from the dockmaster telling me that the boat is sinking, so that's good too.  I did all this in the marina without the help of a boatyard so it's good to know that I can get to the engine in a pinch without needing to have vessel assist tow me.

 

The good news is that the transmission repair shop actually turned around the repair rather quickly.  Evidently the gearbox and clutches are fine, but the shift assembly had some corrosion in it that prevented it from operation.  They dunked it in some diesel and I guess it's bench testing fine now.  So I know my project for this weekend -- getting that back in the boat.

 

I went and picked up one of these today which should help me align the engine back on it's mounts. http://www.harborfreight.com/1.....t-996.html  If I were to do the project again, I'd probably use this from the start.

 

I'd offer to help you with your engine, but I sadly live on the wrong coast....ha!  I guess my next project is rebuilding the gooseneck when my new welder shows up!  Happy sailing.

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Scott Carle
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May 13, 2014 - 2:24 pm
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 lol... that drop into the bilge does result in lots of cursing.. I have found two things that help a lot... actually three.. one is a clothes hanger with a hook bent into the end.. The next one would be one of the extending magnetic pickup tools. Third is a long grab claw with the claw on one end and the hand grip on the other that you squeeze to get the grabbers to close. The only thing I have permanently lost down there so far was a stainless washer that the magnet thing couldn't get a grip on.

 

Our goose neck had to be re-welded on the port side where the original weld started to crack. Since it was re-welded it has seemed fine. Original welds looked pretty but I'm assuming someone didn't use the right current or something when welding it as the weld must have been a bit brittle there.

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Scott Carle DE38 Cutter s/v Valkyr
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Patrick Twohig
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May 13, 2014 - 2:37 pm
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Yeah, they put a hard vang on the boat but left the swiveling boom so the hard vang is getting all bent out of shape.  I'm going to be pulling the end cap off, making a new clevis and fitting it to the existing gooseneck.  When that's done, I'll have it heat treated at a shop for maximum strength.

 

What part is cracked, the stainless or the aluminum part of the gooseneck?  If it's stainless, I'd take it off the mast, grind out the crack and refill it with a stick welder, then grind it flat again.  Stainless is a really poor heat conductor so it warps all to hell when you weld it.  I'd guess when it was welded they left some internal stresses in the parts.  How old is it?

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Jonathan Oasis
S/V OASIS
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May 14, 2014 - 12:35 am
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Excellent pictures.   A little off topic but does your heat exchanger for your 5434 have a pencil zinc?  I have looked at all angles of mine and while I assume there must be a zinc bolted in there somewhere, I haven't found it.  Sure would like to replace it if there is one.

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Scott Carle
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May 14, 2014 - 7:39 am
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yes if it is the stock exchanger it has zincs in it but to be honest I'm not sure if they are internal or external.. I think that you have to take the whole end cap off and then install them but don't hold me to it. That is on my todo list though.

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Scott Carle DE38 Cutter s/v Valkyr
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Patrick Twohig
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May 14, 2014 - 2:19 pm
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While it's all taken apart I may as well check that zinc. It turns out the only thing really wrong with the transmission was the shift assembly that sticks out the side.  The mechanic had to free it up using a hammer but he lubed it and cleaned out the little bit of corrosion.  

For future reference, it's good to know that if the shifter binds up again, I can pop the four bolts off the side of the transmission and free up that part without having to get the whole gearbox out of there.  Though it may be a good idea to pump the fluid out before taking it off, unless you want to leak fluid in your bilge.

We noticed one of the seals on the gearbox was leaking badly so he's ordering a replacement set while it's out.  It's also good to know that the gearbox, which got seawater inside, is otherwise okay.

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Scott Carle
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May 14, 2014 - 5:56 pm
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glad it has been a minor learning experience rather than a major replacement one 🙂

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